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Tips & Tricks |Flower Life
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“Why are my flowers drooping?”, “Which flowers last longest?”, “How often should I change the water in the vase?”, “How often should I cut the stems?”, “How do I make my flowers last longer!”.


The list of flower-care related questions we hear from customers – and discuss at Floom HQ – goes on and on, so we though it fit to demystify any pre-conceived flower care commandments, with a little help from three experts from the Floom fam. Weighing in from the green corner we have Migle from Your London Florist (in you’ve guessed it, London), Samantha from Mini Rose Co in New York, and Darya from Flowerboy Project in our newest city, Los Angeles.

Consider Floom your Agony Aunt for all things botanical – here are the expert tips you need to extend the lifetime of your beloved stems.


1. Migle, @YourLondonFlorist, London

“Always avoid direct sunlight, and never place your flowers next to radiator, heater or under an air conditioner.”


What are your top three tips for making a bouquet last longer?

1. Remove all the leaves from the stems which will be sitting in the water

2. Change water every 3 days

3. Re-cut the stems every time you change the water

No Leaf Zone

What are the rules for placing your flowers at home?

Always avoid direct sunlight, and never place your flowers next to radiator, heater or under an air conditioner.


Which type of stems would you recommend for longevity?

Every season we have different flowers. For example, at the moment Ilex berries will last until Christmas (four to five weeks), while amaryllis – a slow opening flower – will last for around two or three.

In spring, we have gorgeous hyacinthus which will gradually open over three weeks if kept in a cool room. It’s trickier in the summer as flowers are in full bloom, but I would recommend peonies and lilies. Then in the autumn we have a variety of gorgeous chrysanthemum blooms which will last for four to five weeks.


2. Samantha, @MiniRoseCo, New York

“Fresh and plentiful water will keep your flowers happier for longer!”

What are your top flower care tips?

We recommend changing the water every other day, and if possible, giving a fresh cut to the bottom of the stems. It’s also important you know the needs of your flowers. For example, for stems like peonies, tulips, dahlias and other more heat sensitive flowers, you should add cold water (even ice cubes) into the vase to ensure the longest life span. When switching woodier stems like hydrangea, lilac and roses you can add very warm water.

Clean Water Is Key

Which long lasting flowers do you like to work with?

We like using roses, orchids, calla lilies and lots of funky pods, textural greens and other interesting elements like kumquats and artichokes to bring a unique feeling to a floral arrangement that will have a longer lasting life span.


What’s your golden rule?

I always say, ‘flowers are a living thing’. You would never leave water in your dog’s bowl for days on end without replacing it… After a few days, the water is low and murky and old. The same goes with your flowers. Fresh and plentiful water will keep your flowers happier for longer!


3. Darya, @FlowerboyProject, Los Angeles

“Flowers like to be as cool as possible. You can sometimes cheat them by putting a bit of ice in the vase”

What are your top three tips for making a bouquet last longer?

1. Cut a small bit off of the base of the stem and change water every single day. Clean water is definitely number one in keeping your flowers fresh

2. Try to keep all leaves out of the water

3. Always clean your vases with soap and hot water or even a bit of bleach to keep any bacteria from forming

Blooms On Ice

Which type of stems do you recommend for longevity?

Chrysanthemums, wax flowers, poms and carnations all last for a very long time. Unique stems like banksias and proteas hold up very well too. And of course you can always dry flowers and preserve them that way.

Where do you recommend placing your flowers for optimum life?

Keep your flowers out of the sun if possible. Living in Los Angeles, I can attest that this is not always easy, but flowers like to be as cool as possible. You can sometimes cheat them by putting a bit of ice in the vase.